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At age 7, Colton Thompson received the best gift ever – sight. Colton's vision began to dim not long after he suffered a gruesome fishing accident. In eager anticipation of a big catch with a new lure, his older brother sent a hasty cast into Colton’s left eye.

March is National Workplace Eye Wellness Month. Following some simple steps and advice can help keep your eyes healthy and safe.

Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss worldwide. It affects more than 3 million people in the United States—nearly half of whom are unaware they have the disease. During Glaucoma Awareness Month in January, The West Virginia Academy of Eye Physicians & Surgeons joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public that early detection and treatment can help protect your sight.

Glaucoma damages the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. Typically, the disease initially has no signs or symptoms. If left untreated, glaucoma can cause irreversible blindness.

The Academy recommends that everyone have a comprehensive eye exam at age 40. This exam provides ophthalmologists – physicians who specialize in medical and surgical eye care – an opportunity to carefully examine the eye including the optic nerve for signs of damage and other possible problems that may affect vision. Individuals at greater risk for developing glaucoma include people:

WVAEPS and the American Academy of Ophthalmology urge making eye health part of a daily work wellness routine

On-the-job safety goes well beyond avoiding slips, falls, and heavy lifting. Caring for your eyes should be a high priority and part of an overall workplace wellness routine. This is important because each day, about 2,000 U.S. workers sustain a job-related eye injury that requires medical treatment.

  • However, 90 percent of these accidents can be avoided by wearing eye protection
  • As part of an ongoing effort to stress the importance of workplace eye wellness, the [INSERT ORGANIZATION NAME] and the American Academy of Ophthalmology, during the month of March, is encouraging the public to do right by their eyes and wear appropriate eye protection.
  • Workplace eye injuries cost more than $300 million a year in lost productivity, treatment, and compensation
  • These injuries range from simple eye strain to trauma, which may lead to permanent damage, vision loss, and blindness. This is particularly true for workers in construction, manufacturing, and mining. Approximately, 40 percent of eye injuries in the workplace happen in these three industries
  • If an eye injury does occur, an individual should seek care from an ophthalmologist — a physician who specializes in the medical and surgical treatment of eye diseases and conditions — or go to an emergency room for immediate care.

With the holiday shopping season now in full swing, West Virginia Academy of Eye Physicians & Surgeons joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public of certain safety guidelines when choosing the perfect gifts for little ones in their lives. A number of recent studies have shown that some popular toy types are commonly associated with childhood eye injuries. These include air guns and other toys that shoot projectiles, high-powered lasers, and sports equipment.

Ophthalmologists – physicians who specialize in medical and surgical eye care – treat the eye injuries that sometimes result from these products. The Academy is encouraging parents to follow these tips when gifting toys to children this holiday season.

The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome VK Raju, MD, FRCS, FACS, Ophthalmologist, to their prestigious organization with his upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. He is a highly trained and qualified ophthalmologist with a vast expertise in all facets of his work, especially Cataract Surgery, Lasik Surgery, and Corneal Transplant. Dr. Raju has been in practice for 35 years and is currently serving patients at his private practice located in Morgantown, West Virginia. Furthermore, he is a Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at West Virginia University, where he has been teaching since 1976. Dr. Raju prides himself in his innovational and outstanding dedication to patient care.

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