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The American Academy of Ophthalmology is pleased to recognize Dr. Larry Schwab with the 2020 International Blindness Prevention Award, which honors an individual who has made significant contributions to reducing blindness and/or restoring sight worldwide.

Dr. Schwab was selected for the award by the Global Education and Outreach Committee for his global impact in three areas: 1) long-term collaboration, networking and consulting in policy, planning and implementing blindness prevention programs; 2) direct care, teaching and training clinical officers, medical assistants and nurses in the developing world, particularly Africa and Asia, and 3) speaking, advocating and supporting blindness prevention programs at academic institutions, medical societies, communities and with international health officials throughout his career.

Two West Virginia University faculty members who embody WVU’s land-grant mission of teaching, research and service are the recipients of WVU’s 2019 Heebink Awards for Distinguished Service to the state of West Virginia.

Charles Moore, the recipient of the Extended Service Award, is the medical director of the WVU Eye Institute and an assistant professor in the department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences in the School of Medicine.

At age 7, Colton Thompson received the best gift ever – sight. Colton's vision began to dim not long after he suffered a gruesome fishing accident. In eager anticipation of a big catch with a new lure, his older brother sent a hasty cast into Colton’s left eye.

March is National Workplace Eye Wellness Month. Following some simple steps and advice can help keep your eyes healthy and safe.

Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss worldwide. It affects more than 3 million people in the United States—nearly half of whom are unaware they have the disease. During Glaucoma Awareness Month in January, The West Virginia Academy of Eye Physicians & Surgeons joins the American Academy of Ophthalmology in reminding the public that early detection and treatment can help protect your sight.

Glaucoma damages the optic nerve, which transmits visual information from the retina to the brain. Typically, the disease initially has no signs or symptoms. If left untreated, glaucoma can cause irreversible blindness.

The Academy recommends that everyone have a comprehensive eye exam at age 40. This exam provides ophthalmologists – physicians who specialize in medical and surgical eye care – an opportunity to carefully examine the eye including the optic nerve for signs of damage and other possible problems that may affect vision. Individuals at greater risk for developing glaucoma include people:

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