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(HealthNewsDigest.com) - SAN FRANCISCO – Men suffer from nearly three times as many eye injuries as women, according to a survey conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (Academy) and the American Society of Ocular Trauma (ASOT). The annual Eye Injury Snapshot, a clinical survey of eye injuries across the U.S., conducted from May 16 to May 23 this year, found that men suffered the majority (73.5 percent) of the eye injuries. Annually, 2.5 million Americans suffer eye injuries and more than 52 percent of all injuries are taking place at home.

“It is often the most common household chores and activities that can lead to devastating eye injuries,” said Randolph L. Johnston, MD, president of the Academy. “Taking the time to protect your eyes while performing these tasks is the easiest way to protect your sight.”

 

Derek Sprunger, MD was recognized at the American Academy of Eye Physicians & Surgeons July 2010 Secretariat for State Affairs meeting for his service on the Secretariat.  Dr. Sprunger’s five-year term on the Secretariat will be complete at the end of this year.  The Secretariat for State Affairs is made up of two committees:  the Committee for State Governmental Affairs and the Committee for State Organizational Development. 

San Francisco, CA (Vocus) August 24, 2010

EyeCare America, a national non-profit organization that provides eye exams and eye health information to medically underserved communities is exposing five common eye care myths in honor of September’s Save Your Sight Month.

Five Common Eye Care Myths:

1.    Reading, sewing or doing other close work in dim light can damage your eyes.
Fact: Reading in dim light can cause eye fatigue, but it will not damage your eyes. Good lighting will make reading easier and will prevent eye fatigue, especially for older people whose lenses no longer change shape as easily as they did when they were younger.

2.    Carrots are the key to good vision
Fact: Yes, carrots are rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene, which are essential for maintaining good sight. But carrots are not the only eye healthy food. If you’re not a fan of carrots, don’t worry, there are plenty of other foods to choose from. For more beta-carotene rich choices, look for deep orange or yellow fruits and vegetables such as cantaloupe, mangos, apricots, peaches, and sweet potatoes.

VisionCare Ophthalmic Technologies, Inc., a developer of advanced visual prosthetic devices, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's Implantable Miniature Telescope (by Dr. Isaac Lipshitz) to improve vision in patients with end-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD). VisionCare's first-of-kind telescope implant is integral to a new patient care program, CentraSight, for treating patients with end-stage macular degeneration - the most advanced form of AMD in the U.S. and the leading cause of blindness in older Americans.

"This is truly a breakthrough technology for AMD patients as their treatment options have been limited until now," said Kathryn A. Colby, M.D., Ph.D., ophthalmic surgeon at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary in Boston and an Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. "The clinical results from the pivotal FDA trial have proven we can place this tiny telescope prosthesis inside the eye to help patients see better and, for some, even to levels at which they can recognize people and facial expressions that they could not before."

Copyright 2010 The Register-Herald

The Register-Herald (Beckley, West Virginia) 

Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Business News 

February 23, 2010 Tuesday 

SECTION: STATE AND REGIONAL NEWS 

ACC-NO: 20100223-WZ-Optometrists-win-battle-in-surgery-bill-0223 

LENGTH: 601 words 

HEADLINE: Optometrists win battle in surgery bill 

BYLINE: Mannix Porterfield, The Register-Herald, Beckley, W.Va. 

BODY:

   Feb. 23--CHARLESTON -- West Virginia optometrists scored a major victory Monday in an amended Senate bill that expands their scope of practice to embrace three types of laser surgery to treat glaucoma patients.

   After weeks of intense debate and lobbying, the Senate accepted an amendment by Judiciary Chairman Jeffrey Kessler to widen the range of practice, setting up a showdown today on the bill itself.

   Before his amendment was adopted, Government Organization Chairman Ed Bowman, D-Hancock, sought to compromise the bill by narrowing laser surgery to a single one. Originally, the bill allowed four lines of surgery.

   Kessler said optometrists have been treating glaucoma cases since 1976, but Sen. Dan Foster, D-Kanawha, countered that no lasers have been involved.

   "It's a far cry from simply treating it with a drug to this type of procedure," Foster maintained.

By Phil Kabler

Staff writer for the Charleston Gazette

CHARLESTON, W.Va. -- A bill to allow optometrists to perform certain surgical procedures on patients' eyes (SB230) remained in limbo for a sixth day Tuesday, as senators debated behind the scenes whether to send the bill to Health and Human Resources Committee.

The measure -- which has caused considerable infighting between optometrists and ophthalmologists -- advanced from the Senate Government Organization Committee on Feb. 10, but the bill has not been reported to the Senate floor.

Senators, huddling during Tuesday's floor session to confer on the issue, were trying to get a headcount on whether there are enough votes to refer the bill to the Health Committee.

Health and Human Resources Chairman Roman Prezioso, D-Marion, said he's leaving it up to the members to decide whether to send the bill to his committee.

However, he said, the integrity of the legislative process will be compromised if the bill is allowed to bypass the committee.

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